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A Natural Progression

Brook Katz, South Florida, USA 

As a man of logic and reasoning, it was an obvious choice for me to go into the sciences. I moved towards the fields of medicine. It seemed natural to watch someone be cut open to have body parts removed, and then go to lunch and have a big burger or slab of animal muscle laid in front of me to eat.

Science had taught me that we were meat eaters and that was the most efficient way to get the 100 grams of protein a day that we needed. It also taught me that the greatest source of calcium and other nutrients was the lactose bovine solution from the udders of cows, and that if I didn’t have at least 25% of my daily intake from this source I would become somehow deficient and possibly put my life at risk. These were facts! So we were told.

Back then I didn’t connect the dots to see how much money influenced all these so called “facts”. I believed in the science, as science couldn’t be wrong; it was science! As I reached the almost 300lb mark on my scale, and suffering from an array of maladies, I had an epiphany. The logical side of me said the science isn’t working.

My sister, a long time ethical vegan, had touted the moral and ethical side of veganism for years, but I had brushed her off because she didn’t have the science to back up anything she said. I called it “fluff,” when people play to your emotional side rather than the reasoning side. But a change did need to happen and I didn’t know what, or even where to turn.

Then I met my mentor, my friend, and the person who opened my eyes to the truth, Dr. Michael Klaper. He pulled me through the looking glass and I’ve never turned back. He showed me that science was biased because of economics. We studied the true anatomy and physiology of the human body together, and I realized that all the numbers were skewed because of the animal industries.

Years of scientific research have now shown us that humans need way less protein, get way too much fat, and have absolutely no need at all for that substance called “dairy”. We have learned that most of the harm done to the body is from what we put into it. The strange thing was that I found myself in an almost Darwinian evolution. I found that as I no longer had to kill an animal for food, the need to use an animal for his or her skin or glandular fluids seemed less logical.

Then it happened. It was such a natural progression that I didn’t even realize it. I found myself in touch with not only other animals, but the environment, water conservation, global warming, health issues, and worst of all, feelings! I started feeling for anyone and everything. It was like something had moved me to a different level of awareness. Like I had climbed the next rung on the evolutionary ladder.

So why will I stay vegan the rest of my life? Because I continue to move up that ladder, and going backwards is not my direction or a possibility. As I approach my 30th year of veganism, logic still dictates my mind, but compassion now rules my heart. Thank you to all who helped make it happen.

 

Special thanks to Butterflies Katz for including this as one of 100+ entries in her short essay contest and the resulting published collection: Why I Will Always be Vegan.

Photo by Judith Prins on Unsplash

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